Abingdon Naturalists Society Surveys

Abingdon Naturalists Society have attached lists of plants they found on four visits to the ash pits - April to August. Nine Abingdon Naturalist (ABNATS) Volunteers concentrated mainly on Pit H/I, dividing it notionally into 8 habitat areas with separate worksheets for each. On Pit G they surveyed just the low-lying marshy part.

The presence of rare and threatened species is important in achieving the objective to provide data to help save these areas after Npower ceases funding Earth Trust in 2020.

This year ABNATS recorded 12 species on the Oxfordshire Rare Plants Register, 2018 (Oxon RPR). On a National level, using the Red Listing, (based on 2001 IUCN Guidelines), one plant is listed Vulnerable and four Near Threatened or Scarce.

On Pit HI ABNATS recorded 153 species, of which 10 are listed on Oxon RPR. Nationally, one plant, Round-fruited Rush is listed as Vulnerable while three others are Near Threatened or Scarce. (Click on the tab 'Notable Species' to see the list of notable plants and their conservation status).

The marshy area of Pit G (G1) was particularly diverse with eight Oxon RPR species recorded. On the National list: one Vulnerable, two Near Threatened / Scarce.

Previously in the 2016 surveys of Pits JP and G AbNats recorded 163 species including four Near Threatened species, three of which are not on the recent list. So taking account of all the records for all pits, the tally is: one Vulnerable, seven Near Threatened/Scarce and 15 Oxon RPR species.


Sunday 23 September 2018 - Abingdon Naturalists Society


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